The Unknown Danger of Toothpaste

The Nasty Little Secrets of Toothpaste Have you ever heard the old saying, “Question Everything?”  It turns out this old saying has some value to it and it’s time to put it into action.  Let’s question the one thing that very few people ever pause to even think about… their toothpaste.  It cleans your teeth, leaves you with fresh breath…what is there to question?  It turns out that there is plenty to question.  Keep reading… Have you ever examined the ingredients on the label of your toothpaste?  If you haven’t, you may not be able until you make a return trip to the store.  A recent examination exposed the fact that some companies started to remove the ingredients from the tube of toothpaste and put them on the box that you throw away.  Now why would they do that?  Are they concerned that a website like PoisonTruth.com might come along and suggest you actually go read the ingredients on your the label?  That couldn’t be it, could it? Let’s take a closer look at a few of the common ingredients found in toothpaste.  Two of those ingredients are on our Top Ten Toxins list, propylene glycol and sodium lauryl sulfate.  Let’s examine these two ingredients: Propylene Glycol (PG): As a ‘surfactant’ or wetting agent and solvent, this ingredient is actually the active component in antifreeze. There is no difference between the PG used in industry and the PG used in personal care products. It is used in industry to break down protein and cellular structure (what the skin is made of) yet is found in most forms of make-up, hair products, lotions, after-shaves, deodorants, mouthwashes and toothpastes. It is also used in food processing. Because of its ability to quickly penetrate the skin, the EPA requires workers to wear protective gloves, clothing and goggles when working with this toxic substance. The Material Safety Data Sheets warn against skin contact, as PG has systemic consequences such as brain, liver and kidney abnormalities. Consumers are not protected nor is there a warning label on products such as stick deodorants, where the concentration is greater than that in most industrial applications. Sodium Lauryl Sulfate (SLS) & Sodium Laureth Sulfate (SLES): Used as detergents and surfactants, these closely related compounds are found in car wash soaps, garage floor cleaners and engine degreasers. Yet both SLS and SLES are used more widely as one...

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